GHANA – Musique et chant traditionnels maltais

A faire paraître en juin

Article sur festival – 22-23 juin – Għanafest – Festival de musique et chant traditionnels maltais

+ FEST 2018 – METTRE AFFICHE – TROUVER UNE VIDEO

Għanafest 2018 – http://għanafest.com/category/english/

For its 20th edition, Għanafest 2018 was launched as part of the St.Gregory festivities in Żejtun. Għanafest is a festival that compiles local… For its 20th edition, Għanafest 2018 was launched as part of the St.Gregory festivities in Żejtun. Għanafest is a festival that compiles local and foreign traditional music and singing with the aim of promoting local artists. The festival will be held in the recently renovated… Lire plus : http://għanafest.com/category/english/

lien vers cette page

22 au 23 juin – Għanafest – Festival de musique et chant traditionnels maltais – Organisé par Għanafest et supporté par Valletta2018 – Lieu : Buskett Gardens, Siġġiewi – Google Map – Savoir plus sur le Għana : site officiel de Għanafest

 

SONGS OF OUR FATHERS

Għana is as much a part of our heritage as the Neolithic temples and the Baroque churches, says Ruben Zahra.  And, like those, it’s here to stay.

 

Who is the għannej?

The għannej is more than just a singer.  He is a poet with the capacity of improvising verse in rhythm and in rhyme.  The most popular style of għana is known as Spirtu Pront, essentially, an improvised song-duel between two għannejja.  Usually, the subject of the duel emerges early in the encounter itself, with the singers provoking their adversary.  The għannej demonstrates his ability in the craft by observing the correct metre of the verse, matching the rhyme and composing a clever argument to outsmart his opponent.

Would you say għana remains the domain of the older generation? 

Is it dying; or has it made a comeback?  In what way is it changing?

A lot of people might have the impressin that għana is dying out or that it is only fostered by old-timers.  Għana has always been a subculture.  Għana sessions are hardly ever publicised on the official media or on national cultural calendars.  Għana sessions take place every Sunday morning in a few wine bars around Malta and the enthusiasts that follow għana are well aware of these hubs.  Every fortnight or so, other sessions are organised – that are disseminated simply by word of mouth.  There are several young għannejja and folk guitarists.  The youngest protagist is seven years old Nordai Desira from Żejtun, who sings with his grandfather Joseph Muscat ‘in-Nizza.’

How much does Maltese music tell us about ourselves as people, our past and our culture?

How Much of it has been lost?  How much can be revived?  And should we care?

Maltese folk music portrays an interesting mix of different Mediterranean ingredients that, in many ways, represents the Maltese character.  The Maltese bagpipe, iż-Żaqq, is probably of Aegean origin; yet the terminology of all its different parts is Arabic.  The guitar music that accompanies għana fil-Għoli, another style of Maltese  folksong, is sung on a high vocal register with a distinct melodic contour reminiscent of other forms of Mediterranean chant.  I believe that every country should preserve, foster and care about its own heritage.  Għana is part of our heritage, just as much as the Neolithic temples and the Baroque churches.